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SoRoUnderpass daytime credit Elizabeth Billings
Arts for All: How philanthropy can make the arts accessible and affordable

The power of art to inspire, comfort, and stretch the imagination is something all people can benefit from—not just those who can find their way to a museum, pay for a concert ticket, or hire a piano teacher for their children. Philanthropy can help increase access, nourish the artistic spirit, and support Vermont's creative economy at a time when it hasn't fully rebounded from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read the brief "Arts for All: How philanthropy can make the arts accessible and affordable " »

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Meeting in the Middle: How philanthropy can expand access to homeownership

Vermont needs additional housing of all types. An important piece of the puzzle is the creation of homeownership opportunities for the missing middle—buyers who don't qualify for income-restricted housing programs but can't afford market-rate homes. Philanthropy can help preserve Vermont's high homeownership rate with strategies that target middle income buyers.

Read the brief "Meeting in the Middle: How philanthropy can expand access to homeownership" »

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The Stranglehold of Student Debt: How charitable giving can bring relief

In 2020, a study by the Vermont Futures Project found that after paying for rent, childcare, food, cars, insurance, and an estimated $635 a month in student loans, a couple with one child would have about $75 a month in disposable income. Philanthropy can pave the way for new strategies to minimize debt and increase education attainment.

Read the brief "The Stranglehold of Student Debt: How charitable giving can bring relief" »